Research Methods 250

IMG_8509Course: 250

Semester:

Class Location:

Time: 9:10-1:10 and 3:10-5

To adhere to New York City and State fire codes, classroom exits cannot be obstructed and doors should not be not shut/locked. Please also leave laboratory cubicle doors open.

Public safety: Emergency #212-772-4444 (for Police/Ambulance call 911).
Course Agenda:  With an “arts across curriculum”/interdisciplinary approach to research, this course is designed to help you to acquire the basics of experimental research skills for Psychology Research. This includes the development of research skills such as 1) time management 2) ethics training 3) development of research ideas/innovation 4) study/instrument design 5) variable selection/sampling procedures 6) question framing and hypothesis testing 7) coding techniques 8) reliability/validity 9) networking for research 10) critical analysis of research 11) effective writing and analysis 12) peer-review process and editing 13) oral/visual/media communication.

 

In addition to the goals that I have highlighted above, the Department of Psychology of Hunter College CUNY has identified several goals listed here: “HUNTER COLLEGE OF THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY GENERAL SYLLABUS FOR ALL EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY COURSES Catalog Description: Four credits (2 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory). Prerequisites: Declared psychology major; Engl 120 with a minimum grade of C; one semester of acceptable lab science sequence with a passing grade; Psych 248 with a minimum grade of C. All students are expected to show competence in the following: 1. Research Design 2. Origin of research hypotheses. Dependent and independent variables, determination of relevant variables, controlled and uncontrolled variables, general and procedural (operational) definitions of variables, internal and external validity, reliability. 3. Observational, correlational and experimental research. 4. Within and between subjects designs, order effects (counterbalancing), matching by pre-test, random selection, factorial design, single and matched samples, single subject and group data. 5. Organization, summarization and presentation of findings. 6. Calculation and interpretation of descriptive and inferential statistics. B.  Ethics 1. Informed consent, confidentiality, participant-experimenter interaction, and debriefing.  Completion of the CUNY computer based training (CBT). Note: Classroom exercises cannot be conducted prior to CBT. C.  Information Literacy1.  Information retrieval through library databases (e.g., PsycInfo, PubMed). 2.  Use of abstracts, research journals. 3.  Evaluation of sources. D.  Techniques 1. Data collection and analysis. 2.  Use of computers and other experimental materials/apparatus and equipment for data collection. 3. Use computer programs such as Excel, SPSS, Word, and PowerPoint. E. Communication of Research Results 1. Students in all sections must complete a minimum of four full APA research reports based on data collected for the course. There may be additional assignments. 2.  The final paper should be an original study designed by the student.3. The results of this experiment are to be presented in class preferably in the form of a PowerPoint presentation. ” (FROM DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY, JANUARY 2016)”

“All syllabi should include the departmental learning outcomes listed below:

  1. Understand fundamentals of scientific methodology, including research design, hypothesis testing, variable selection, and sampling methodologies.
  2. Understand the fundamentals of ethical research, including but not limited to the completion of the CUNY online ethics certification (CBT).
  3. Demonstrate information literacy by conducting literature searches and evaluating source materials.
  4. Carry out data collection using multiple modalities (observational, experimental, etc.) in conjunction with data analysis using computer based software.
  5. Effectively communicate results through research papers and oral presentations.” (Dr. Amber Martin, August 22, 2016)

 

INFORMATION

 

Teacher: Professor Tricia Striano

Thomas Hunter Hall #507

Phone: 212-772-5678

TA Name:

Office hours for TA:

Office Location for TA:

 

 

Office hours for Professor Striano: Office hours are held Tuesday 11am. Please schedule for visiting office hour with Dr. Striano in class or via email.  When I confirm your appointment time via email, I will let you know you the exact location of our meeting. My office is in a secured suite. You will need to be buzzed in. If you arrange an appointment for office hours via email, write “OFFICE HOUR” in the email subject heading. Only use your Hunter College email address when corresponding with the Professor or with the TA. Send your email request to tstriano@hunter.cuny.edu prior to Friday at 4pm. Please describe the nature of your visit.

 

REASON FOR MY VISIT: Please explain the reason for your visit here

*QUESTIONS THAT I WOULD LIKE ADDRESSED:

QUESTION 1:

QUESTION 2:

Please be as specific as possible about the questions that you would like addressed at office hours. This helps both of us prepare for our meeting.

Try not to write, “I HAVE A QUESTION ABOUT PAPER 1.”

Rather try to express the exact nature of your question in your request, “On Page 3 Paragraph 2 on my paper assignment, Titled XXXXX, I lost one point and would like to understand why.”

Materials for the course include:

* Doing Developmental Research: A Practical Guide. Guilford Press. 2016 (ISBN 9781462524433 or ISBN 9781462524426) “Addressing practical issues rarely covered in methods texts, this user-friendly, jargon-free book helps students and beginning researchers plan infant and child development studies and get them done. The author provides step-by-step guidance for getting involved in a developmental laboratory and crafting effective research questions and proposals. Tips on recruiting study participants cover access issues—such as how to overcome language and cultural barriers—and include helpful sample scripts. The book offers time management strategies, pointers for organizing and communicating data, and a roadmap of the journal publication process, complete with an annotated sample article. Numerous concrete examples, checklists, worksheets, and exercises are featured. Reproducible forms can be downloaded and printed in a convenient 8½” x 11″ size.” (Guilford Press).

Unless instructed otherwise, please bring this workbook to our class each week as we will often do in-class exercises and assignments. Please do not use an “e-copy” of your book in class given that cell phones/ computer use is not permitted in my classroom unless instructed.

* InsightOut: Get ideas out of your head and into the world. Harper Collins. 2015. (ISBN 978-0-06-230127-7). “In this revolutionary guide, Stanford University Professor and international bestselling author of inGenius adopts her popular course material to teach everyone how to make imaginative ideas a reality. As a leading expert on creativity, Tina Seelig has continually explored what we can each do to unleash our entrepreneurial spirit. In Insight Out, she offers us the tools to make our ideas a reality. She clearly defines the concepts of imagination, creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurism, showing how they affect each other and how we can unlock the pathway from imagination to implementation, where our ideas then gain the power to inspire the imaginations of others. Drawing on more than a decade of experience as a professor at the Stanford University School of Engineering, Seelig shows readers how to work through the steps of imagination, ideation, innovation, and implementation, using each step to build upon the last, to ultimately create something complex, interesting, and powerful. Coping with today’s constant change, everyone needs these skills to conquer challenges and seize the opportunities that arise. Seelig irrefutably demonstrates that these skills can be taught, and shows us how to mobilize our own energy and bring new ideas to life” (Harper Collins).

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th Edition ISBN-10: 1433950618 “The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association is the style manual of choice for writers, editors, students, and educators in the social and behavioral sciences. It provides invaluable guidance on all aspects of the writing process, from the ethics of authorship to the word choice that best reduces bias in language. Well-known for its authoritative and easy-to-use reference and citation system, the Publication Manual also offers guidance on choosing the headings, tables, figures, and tone that will result in strong, simple, and elegant scientific communication. “ (From APA.org).
Note: Please try to take notes with a paper notebook or in your workbook. If you would like to watch a movie, check social media, monitor the news or make a call or send a text, please do so from the location of your choice outside of the classroom. Computers/tablets/phones should be safely stored and placed off your desk unless instructed otherwise. Your phone ringer should be off. For class, you will also need:

* 20 notecards and a pen

*Poster board materials. You will not need this until toward the end of the semester. Additional details will be provided.

*A notepad/research log

Prepare for disaster. It is recommended that you find two class partners on the first day of class. Did you get sick? Did your computer crash the day before the assignment is due? That is ok, but you may wish to contact your class partner and try to figure out a solution. It is recommend that you store your partners’ contact information in your cell phone and on a paper notebook. Planning ahead is a key to successful research. Should you wish, take a moment to introduce yourself to your classmates and try to find a few class partners. List the contact information of your possible class partners here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A serious problem:  You may encounter a serious personal problem, illness or situation that prevents you from completing the course or from completing your individual assignments and achieving your goals. In these cases, contact your academic advisor who will advise you. Your advisor can also discuss whether you should withdraw from the course, whether you should take an incomplete, etc. Seek out the appropriate support and guidance so that you can excel in your coursework.  If you are ill or unable to class for some reason simply coordinate with your class partner. For instance, if you have a presentation due, you could send your class partner a link of a video of your presentation blog post, etc.

 

Academic Integrity: “Plagiarism, dishonesty, or cheating will be punished to the full extent allowed according to Hunter College and CUNY regulations. Hunter College regards acts of academic dishonesty as serious offenses against the values of intellectual honesty. The College is committed to enforcing CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity and will pursue cases of academic dishonesty according to the Hunter College Academic Integrity Procedures.”

Forms can be found at http://catalog.hunter.cuny.edu/content.php?catoid=15&navoid=1448

Counseling Center: “Balancing the demands of college and personal life can be challenging. The Hunter College Counseling Service is here to help students handle this stress and pressure successfully and constructively. At times, just talking can make a difference while other times, more intervention is needed. We strive to help our students manage the demands of life through the provision of confidential and individualized counseling services. Our licensed mental health professionals can assist students in overcoming personal, academic, and/or crisis situations that could negatively impact their progress and success at Hunter College. The Counseling Service works closely with the Office of AccessABILITY,Wellness Services and Advising Services to provide comprehensive and coordinated services to all students. We work to create a learning environment where our students feel safe, respected and valued and facilitate the process of developing a balanced and healthy lifestyle, including care for oneself” From

http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/studentservices/pcs/welcome

PersonalCounseling@hunter.cuny.edu

Behavioral Response: http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/brt “Hunter College is committed to the health and safety of the student body, and maintaining a productive learning and working environment. The Hunter College Behavioral Response Team is a group of professionals dedicated to providing support and assistance to students in crisis or in distress. The BRT promotes a culture of mutual support and collaboration and is a resource for all faculty, staff, and students. Our team is designed to: Identify those students in need of assistance

Manage each incident effectively, Provide structure for an effective method of, addressing student behaviors, Initiate appropriate intervention

Promote a coordinated response”

ADA & 504 LAWS: http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/studentservices/access/ada

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973

“In compliance with the American Disability Act of 1990 (ADA) and with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Hunter College is committed to ensuring educational parity and accommodations for all students with documented disabilities and/or medical conditions. It is recommended that all students with documented disabilities (Emotional, Medical, Physical, and/or Learning) consult the Office of AccessABILITY, located in Room E1214B, to secure necessary academic accommodations. For further information and assistance, please call: (212) 772- 4857 or (212) 650-3230”

Note: If you bring accommodation staff to my class, please present your accommodation card.

GRADING: Grading is according to guidelines set forth by Hunter College. Please see guide at Hunter College (i.e., A + is 97.5 to 100 percent, A is 92.5 to 97.4 percent etc.). There are no make up assignments. Late assignments/late papers are not accepted. We are happy to provide feedback, but you will receive a zero on late assignments.

Extra credit

There are up to 15 total points of extra credit points available to everyone in the class.

5 points: Find and attend a talk related to psychology, neuroscience, etc in NYC. Before the talk, share the details of the event with the class and professor. Post the information on your blog or class portfolio. Attend the talk. Re-do the exercise, “Identifying Opportunities” (pg. 197 InsightOut). Prepare and deliver a summary of the event (5 minutes max) and outcomes of the exercise. Consider addressing: What was the purpose of the talk, what was new, who did you meet at the event? Were you able to network before or after the event? What did you take away from the experience overall, in relation to research methods class, and in the context of InsightOut? You may present this at any time of the semester and after discussion with professor.

 

5 points: Complete Exercise 1 and 2 on page 100-102 of DDR. For exercise 2, the video should be for a study you conducted in this class.

 

5 points: Complete Exercise 3 on page 102 of DDR. Stay within 40 blocks of class location. Include a minimum of 20 images on your blog and include details of the location.

 

You should always know your grade in class. If at any time you would like to know your grade or how potentially to improve your grade please schedule an office hour. You begin class with 100 points or an A+. To determine your estimated grade at any point of the class, subtract the points that you have lost from 100. Add any extra credit points that you have been given. Extra credit is graded as great (5 points), very good (4 points), average (3 points), incomplete or did not address the assignment (0-2 points).

 

There are actions/behaviors that will result in losing points toward your final grade in my class. One point of your final grade will be deducted for each occurrence of the below. For instance if your final grade is 88 (B+) and you signed-in late 4X during the semester (-4), ate a hamburger (-1) followed by a nap with head on desk (-1) you would earn B- or (82).

 

Please treat class like a business. 

Grading in this course based on the following assignments. Note that four APA style papers is a Department Requirement.  The TA or Professor will review a complete draft of your paper, assuming that a hard copy is received by 10 am and a minimum 4 business days prior to due date. This allows you time to consider our comments. Please include your Hunter College email address on the first page of the paper so that comments may be e-mailed to you.

LAB 1, APA Paper 1:                                                  10 points

LAB 2, APA Paper 2:                                                  10 points

LAB 3, APA Paper 3:                                                  20 points

LAB 4, Final APA paper 4:                                        20 point

Timely completion of assignments                          20 points

Final Poster                                                                10 points

Final Presentation                                                     10 points

Additional details and resources will be provided in class. In general, each lab/paper is typically between 7 and 10 pages in total. Your DDR Workbook has several checklists that will be used throughout the semester.

Note: Modules, activities and assignments are listed below to serve as a guide for what happens that day in class. If you see Homework assignment, “Read Chapter 3” that means read Chapter 3 before class the following week. The syllabus is a general outline for what is planned to happen in class that day.

Feb 1

Question/thought period

Syllabus/class overview

Developing your blog First.Last (or letters/#) Psych250.wordpress.com or class portfolio

Importance of attending research talks (extra credit)

Question Period

Complete CITI training (Complete and sign CITI/Hunter forms by 10 am next week)

Homework: Obtain books and materials for class

Review syllabus

Read Chapter 1-3 “Doing Developmental Research/DDR” (Guilford Press)

Answer Question 3 (Part 1 and 2) on page 53 of DDR on your blog or portfolio (Planning Research/Time Management for Research)

Skim APA manual

Read pages 1-36 InsightOut

Feb 8

Question/Thought Period and/e.g., work on Project “Write a letter” pg. 18 InsightOut

Complete CITI and discussion of ethics (1 hour)

In Class Internet Exercise: Look at Ethical Standards in Research APA, SRCD etc.

Exercise #3 Page 34-35 DDR Ethics Discussion

The research process: Developing questions: FINDING THE PROBLEM IS THE HARD PART (video)

What’s the question, why is it important, what’s new? Hypothesis testing

Homework review

Introduction to APA style/The Art of APA style/Look at APA Sample paper in class

Lab 1-4 general overview for Lab 1-2 and planning ahead for Lab 3-4

In class Exercise #4, pg 54 DDR. Discuss planning/research organization

Class Project: Complete Exercise # 1 on page 36, INSIGHTOUT (Observations and Inspiration for Research). Post your observations, notes, videos etc. on your Blog/Portfolio to discuss next week in class.

“Art of APA” in class exercise (post on blog).

Writing tips 144-146 overview in class DDR

Graphs/APA/Data visualization Find 2 graphs on the internet. Using techniques discussed in class, re-develop the graphs in APA style format. Post the “before and after” on your blog.

Accessing Databases

In class exercise/project: Using databases available at CUNY, locate and print the paper, Read: Kaefer, T., Pinkham, A. & Neuman, S. Seeing and knowing: Attention to illustrations during storybook reading and narrative comprehension in 2-year-olds. Infant and Child Development, 57-69. (2016).

Look at sections of a published research paper together as a class.

Independent/ dependent variables

In class exercise: Put the above reference in APA style (Word Document) and post on your blog

Surveys and Correlational studies: Pros and Cons, Question Types and development

 

Homework: Note that we do not have class next week. Read Page 83-120 in InsightOUT. Complete Projects 1 & 3 on Page 97 and Project 1 on page 120 post your answers on your blog/class portfolio.

Read Chapter 4 & 5 in DDR

Complete Exercise 4 on Page 54 of DDR post on blog/class portfolio.

Read, Simplifying the Bull: How Picasso helps to teach Apple’s Style

Read Kaefer, T., Pinkham, A. & Neuman, S. Seeing and knowing: Attention to illustrations during storybook reading and narrative comprehension in 2-year-olds. Infant and Child Development, 57-69. (2016).

Read page 121-161 InsightOut

Complete Project #3 on page 138 and #1 on page 161 InsightOut

Read Chapter 5 DDR and with a focus on Lab 3 and Lab 4 complete Exercise 1, 2 and 3 on your blog (pg 87-89).

 

FEB 15 is a Monday schedule


FEB 22

Question/thought period

Review major elements of consent forms. (Review pg 38-42 DDR)

Develop consent forms

Homework review

Effective Approaches to Research/Putting yourself in the shoes of the participant (Page 5 in DDR)

In class group exercise: Find links to 2-3 surveys online. In class Discussion: What was your method to find these? What are pros and cons of these surveys in your view? What styles of questions could you find? What are pros and cons of these surveys? How might this guide your survey development?

Survey/Project development for Lab 1

Details for Lab 1 provided on class handout.

SPSS refresher and why to label variables

Basics of Developing Stimuli, Controls, Confounds and Counterbalancing

Stimuli development at NYPLs

Titles: In class exercise (page 145 DDR) and review/critique current paper titles

Writing the method: Discussion and in class exercise Exercise 1, pg 68 DDR

Discussion of Lab 2, data collection plan.

Tips on summarize literature for Laboratory 2 (see also DDR Chapter 5, 7,8).

Building on the basic architecture from Laboratory 1.

Homework: Read Chapter 7 & 8 DDR. Complete Exercise 1 & 4 page 119-121, document with video on your blog for item 4 if you like. Complete exercise 1, 2 and 3 on your blog (pg 127-128). Provide links/images of the graphs that you post on your blog/portfolio.

 

March 1 (TA)

Question/thought period

Homework review

SPSS overview

Descriptive statistics (See Chapter 8) for LAB 2

Review APA manual for how to present descriptive statistics on charts and graphs

Reporting Chi Square test (video)

Learning to use Excel (video)

Organizing your data Chapter 7 & 8 in DDR

Homework: Lab 1 Write up

Read pg 163 to 203 InsightOut

MARCH 8

Question/thought period

Look at prior class poster donations

Lab 1 due at 12:00 (hard copy).

Lab 2, Coding & Reliability Discussion

More on experiment types, pros and cons of different experiment types.

Variable selection

Operational definitions

Class project on coding: Exercise 2 Page 72 DDR

Homework: Exercise 2 on Page 69 DDR

Lab 3 continue to develop

Select/Post 3 to 4 peer reviewed papers you will read for lab 3

MARCH 15

Question/thought period

The peer review process

Homework review

In class, exercise 1 and 2 on page 157-158 (writing/editing) DDR

Giving oral presentations/Communicating your research Chapter 11 DDR

Developing Lab 3 and 4 (i.e., think “Insight Out”)

Present your questions for Lab 3

Mock data entry for lab 3 upload to your blog

Homework: Complete both parts of How Many Scientists Fabricate Exercise, #4 pg 35 DDR, include any relevant links on your blog/portfolio

MARCH 22

Question/thought period

Lab 2 due today at 12:45

Begin development of lab 3 /Tips from Insight Out

Homework review/discussion

Present mock set up/study for Study 3

Homework: work on Lab 3

MARCH 29

Question/thought period

Present mock data sheets for lab 3.

Review summary of strategies for statistics Chapter 8

Data collection for Lab 3.

 

Homework: Complete exercise 2 on pg 127 DDR
APRIL 5

Question/thought period

Review Chapter 8 “Strategies for Using Statistics”

Work on mock data for APA project # 4/SPSS files

See Chapter 7 and 8

  

APRIL 12 SPRING BREAK
APRIL 19

Question/thought period

Lab 3 due today at 12:45pm

Begin to develop Lab 4, Present questions

Extra Credit Assignment given (up to 10 points)

Homework: Work on Lab 4

APRIL 26  

Question/thought period

Lab 4

Basics of poster presentations

In class poster presentation assignment/critique

Oral Presentation of Lab 3 (2 minutes). It may be presented as a video.

Homework: Work on Lab 4

MAY 3

Question/thought period

Lab 4

Extra credit presentations

Homework: Work on Lab 4 and Read Chapter 11 in DDR

MAY 10

Question/thought period

Lab 4

Peer reviews of Lab 4 (projects to papers)

Networking at conferences and in the social sciences DDR

Presenting your own posters, review page 162 in DDR

Course Evaluation

Extra credit Presentations

Homework: Work on Lab 4

MAY 17

Question/thought period

Lab 4 due today at 12:45

Conference/poster preparation

Conference begins at 3:10 am with a “reception.” 2 minute (polished) poster presentation follows the conference reception/networking phase.

Supplemental Material

Notes CITI NOTES, LINKS, FORMS

http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/irb/repository/files/forms/irb%20coversheet%20VER%203-12.pdf

http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/irb/repository/files/forms/Revised%20irb%20classroom%20practica-2.pdf

http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/irb/repository/files/forms/classroom_practica_student_certification-01-12.pdf

 

“FROM DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY

All students and Faculty must complete the CITI Program to fulfil the IRB requirements for conducting research in the classroom. This must be completed before any data collection takes place. The forms are available on the CUNY Commons website (more on that in a minute) or on the IRB website at http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/irb/downloadable-forms. The students must complete the Human Subjects Basic Course (or the refresher where appropriate); the HSR for UG Students version. If you have any questions you can contact the IRB office directly at extension 13053. In order to conduct classroom research at CUNY you must first complete the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI). Go to the website www.citiprogram.org. If you’ve already completed the CITI Program, it is valid for 3 years. You can log in to your account, print out a copy of your completion certificate. If it’s past 3 years, you can still log in, but you’ll have to take a “Refresher Course” and then print out the completion certificate. If you have not taken the CITI Program, you’ll have to start from the beginning by registering for a new account. Registration is a 7 step process. After this you will be able to take the required course, Human Subjects Basic Course for Under Graduate Student – also known as the HSR for Undergraduate Students. Each must be completed to go on to the next:

 

Step 1. Select an organization: City University of New York (CUNY)

Step 2. Enter personal Information

Step 3. Create your user name and password

Step 4. Create an account: You are asked for your country of residence, gender, race, etc.

Step 5. You have an option of receiving credit as a CEU (Continuing Education Unit).  Enter NO

Step 6. You are asked about you role in CUNY.  Enter Student Researcher – Undergraduate.

Step 7. Take the Human Subjects Basic Course, and select the HSR for undergraduate Students.

Click on Finalize and then open the CUNY Courses drop down menu. Select HSR for Undergraduate Students – Basic/Refresher. Complete the Integrity Assurance Statement and then complete the required 8 modules. You don’t need to do the Supplemental Modules.”


 

Hand in with labs

 

Your name:

 

Date:

 

Lab # 1, 2, 3, 4 (circle one)

 

 

I reviewed the APA guidelines                                                                                              YES     NO

I formatted my paper according to the APA guideline                       YES     NO

 

Basic grading strategy/guide

  1. Basic English (10 or more spelling/grammar errors= 1 point deduction, 20 or more = 2 point deduction, etc).
  2. Identifies the question = 1 point
  3. Identifies the hypothesis = 1 point
  4. Identifies why the question is important (Introduction) =1 point
  5. Identifies what is new about the study (Introduction) = 1 point
  6. Computes/report correct statistics (when relevant) =1 point
  7. Follows APA/Basic structure of paper – 1 point for each error (i.e., abstract is 500 words = -1 point, references are prior to the method – 1 point, references are not in the paper – 1 point etc.)

 

 

 

Score:

 

 

 

 

Comment by TA:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comment by Professor:

 

 

 

 

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BOOKS & VIDEOS

Posted in BOOKS | Leave a comment

Research Methods in Developmental Psychology

IMG_8509

Course: Research Methods in Developmental Psychology
Semester: Spring 2017
Class Location: North c 108
Time: 9:45-11am

To adhere to New York City and State fire codes, classroom exits cannot be obstructed and doors should not be not shut/locked. Please also leave laboratory cubicle doors open. Public safety: Emergency #212-772-4444 (for Police/Ambulance call 911).
Course Agenda:  Using an interdisciplinary/arts across curriculum approach, this course is designed to teach you the basics of research methods in developmental psychology with a focus on the first years. In addition to theory and practical research, this course will cover topics such as getting involved in a research laboratory, time management, study design, recruitment and access, organizing and planning research and writing up research. The course will offer you opportunity to critically analyze research papers in the developmental sciences and to develop writing skills in the developmental sciences.

“Research Methods and Special Problems in Developmental Psychology (C; D/S) Open to declared majors only. Theory and research in selected areas of developmental psychology. PSYCH 24800 and 24900 or 25000, one semester of an acceptable science sequence, ENGL 12000 and declaration of a psychology major are the minimum prerequisite for all courses above PSYCH 25000. (Students falling under the previous curriculum need not fulfill the science prerequisite.) prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 15000 or 21000, PSYCH 24900 or 25000, perm instr.” http://catalog.hunter.cuny.edu/content.php?catoid=15&navoid=1394

INFORMATION
Teacher: Professor Tricia Striano
Thomas Hunter Hall #507
Phone: 212-772-5678
Office hours for Professor Striano: Office hours are held Wednesday at 2pm. Please schedule for visiting office hour with Dr. Striano in class or via email.  When I confirm your appointment time via email, I will let you know you the exact location of our meeting. My office is in a secured suite. You will need to be buzzed in. If you arrange an appointment for office hours via email, write “OFFICE HOUR” in the email subject heading. Only use your Hunter College email address when corresponding with the Professor or with the TA. Send your email request to tstriano@hunter.cuny.edu prior to Friday at 4pm. Please describe the nature of your visit.

REASON FOR MY VISIT: Please explain the reason for your visit here

*QUESTIONS THAT I WOULD LIKE ADDRESSED:

QUESTION 1:
QUESTION 2:

Please be as specific as possible about the questions that you would like addressed at office hours. This helps both of us prepare for our meeting.

Try not to write, “I HAVE A QUESTION ABOUT MY PROJECT.”

Rather try to express the exact nature of your question in your request, “I would like to review a draft of my final project proposal with you.”

Materials for the course include:

Required: “DDR” Doing Developmental Research: A Practical Guide. Guilford Press. 2016 (ISBN 9781462524433 or ISBN 9781462524426) “Addressing practical issues rarely covered in methods texts, this user-friendly, jargon-free book helps students and beginning researchers plan infant and child development studies and get them done. The author provides step-by-step guidance for getting involved in a developmental laboratory and crafting effective research questions and proposals. Tips on recruiting study participants cover access issues—such as how to overcome language and cultural barriers—and include helpful sample scripts. The book offers time management strategies, pointers for organizing and communicating data, and a roadmap of the journal publication process, complete with an annotated sample article. Numerous concrete examples, checklists, worksheets, and exercises are featured. Reproducible forms can be downloaded and printed in a convenient 8½” x 11″ size.” (Guilford Press).

Please do not use an “e-copy” of your book in class given that cell phones/ computer use is not permitted in my classroom unless instructed.

Film: Babies (2010). http://www.focusfeatures.com/babies. Available to rent via Amazon, Apple, etc. Directed by award-winning filmmaker Thomas Balmes, from an original idea by producer Alain Chabat, Babies simultaneously follows four babies around the world – from birth to first steps. The children are, respectively, in order of on-screen introduction: Ponijao, who lives with her family near Opuwo, Namibia; Bayarjargal, who resides with his family in Mongolia, near Bayanchandmani; Mari, who lives with her family in Tokyo, Japan; and Hattie, who resides with her family in the United States, in San Francisco.

Re-defining the nonfiction art form, Babies joyfully captures on film the earliest stages of the journey of humanity that are at once unique and universal to us all.

Recommended Supplement: InsightOut: Get ideas out of your head and into the world. Harper Collins. 2015. (ISBN 978-0-06-230127-7). “In this revolutionary guide, Stanford University Professor and international bestselling author of inGenius adopts her popular course material to teach everyone how to make imaginative ideas a reality. As a leading expert on creativity, Tina Seelig has continually explored what we can each do to unleash our entrepreneurial spirit. In Insight Out, she offers us the tools to make our ideas a reality. She clearly defines the concepts of imagination, creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurism, showing how they affect each other and how we can unlock the pathway from imagination to implementation, where our ideas then gain the power to inspire the imaginations of others. Drawing on more than a decade of experience as a professor at the Stanford University School of Engineering, Seelig shows readers how to work through the steps of imagination, ideation, innovation, and implementation, using each step to build upon the last, to ultimately create something complex, interesting, and powerful. Coping with today’s constant change, everyone needs these skills to conquer challenges and seize the opportunities that arise. Seelig irrefutably demonstrates that these skills can be taught, and shows us how to mobilize our own energy and bring new ideas to life” (Harper Collins).

Prepare for disaster. It is recommended that you find two class partners on the first day of class. Did you get sick? Did your computer crash the day before the assignment is due? That is ok, but you may wish to contact your class partner and try to figure out a solution. It is recommend that you store your partners’ contact information in your cell phone and on a paper notebook. Planning ahead is a key to successful research. Should you wish, take a moment to introduce yourself to your classmates and try to find a few class partners. List the contact information of your possible class partners here.

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A serious problem:  You may encounter a serious personal problem, illness or situation that prevents you from completing the course or from completing your individual assignments and achieving your goals. In these cases, contact your academic advisor who will advise you. Your advisor can also discuss whether you should withdraw from the course, whether you should take an incomplete, etc. Seek out the appropriate support and guidance so that you can excel in your coursework.  If you are ill or unable to class for some reason simply coordinate with your class partner. For instance, if you have a presentation due, you could send your class partner a link of a video of your presentation blog post, etc.

Academic Integrity: “Plagiarism, dishonesty, or cheating will be punished to the full extent allowed according to Hunter College and CUNY regulations. Hunter College regards acts of academic dishonesty as serious offenses against the values of intellectual honesty. The College is committed to enforcing CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity and will pursue cases of academic dishonesty according to the Hunter College Academic Integrity Procedures.”

Forms can be found at http://catalog.hunter.cuny.edu/content.php?catoid=15&navoid=1448

Counseling Center: “Balancing the demands of college and personal life can be challenging. The Hunter College Counseling Service is here to help students handle this stress and pressure successfully and constructively. At times, just talking can make a difference while other times, more intervention is needed. We strive to help our students manage the demands of life through the provision of confidential and individualized counseling services. Our licensed mental health professionals can assist students in overcoming personal, academic, and/or crisis situations that could negatively impact their progress and success at Hunter College. The Counseling Service works closely with the Office of AccessABILITY,Wellness Services and Advising Services to provide comprehensive and coordinated services to all students. We work to create a learning environment where our students feel safe, respected and valued and facilitate the process of developing a balanced and healthy lifestyle, including care for oneself” From

http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/studentservices/pcs/welcome

PersonalCounseling@hunter.cuny.edu

Behavioral Response: http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/brt “Hunter College is committed to the health and safety of the student body, and maintaining a productive learning and working environment. The Hunter College Behavioral Response Team is a group of professionals dedicated to providing support and assistance to students in crisis or in distress. The BRT promotes a culture of mutual support and collaboration and is a resource for all faculty, staff, and students. Our team is designed to: Identify those students in need of assistance

Manage each incident effectively, Provide structure for an effective method of, addressing student behaviors, Initiate appropriate intervention

Promote a coordinated response”

ADA & 504 LAWS: http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/studentservices/access/ada

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973

“In compliance with the American Disability Act of 1990 (ADA) and with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Hunter College is committed to ensuring educational parity and accommodations for all students with documented disabilities and/or medical conditions. It is recommended that all students with documented disabilities (Emotional, Medical, Physical, and/or Learning) consult the Office of AccessABILITY, located in Room E1214B, to secure necessary academic accommodations. For further information and assistance, please call: (212) 772- 4857 or (212) 650-3230” Note: If you bring accommodation staff to class, please present your accommodation card.

GRADING: Grading is according to guidelines set forth by Hunter College. Please see guide at Hunter College (i.e., A + is 97.5 to 100 percent, A is 92.5 to 97.4 percent etc.). There are no make up assignments. All of your materials may be posted on your blog or as a hard/copy portfolio if you prefer to remain anonymous. You may use a pre-approved code for your blog name if you wish. We will discuss this in class.

You should always know your approximate grade in class. If at any time you would like to know your grade or how potentially to improve your grade please schedule an office hour. You begin class with 100 points or an A+. To determine your estimated grade at any point of the class, subtract the points that you have lost from 100.

Your grade is based on:

Class portfolio/blog assignments (homework etc.)    50 points
Final presentation                                                             20 points
Final proposal                                                                     30 points

You may select to work in a group of three for the entire semester. With one umbrella topic (i.e., big question), you would submit individual proposals (and receive separate grades). For instance, Student A might focus the final proposal on how infants engage in interaction and student B might focus the proposal on how infants learn from interaction, Student C might focus on parenting behavior of the infants. An example will be given in class. You would submit /develop one blog (which you could all access), work on etc. You would receive one (the same) grade for the blog but separate grades for the presentation/proposal (although you would present together as a group). Some students enjoy learning about and experiencing collaboration, which is often a common part of developmental science research.

Blog assignments/or portfolio. Note that sometimes no word-counts are given for an assignment. That is because you have a great deal of flexibility and your overall blog received a score at the end of the semester. In many cases you may be posting links or videos rather than words. You may modify your blog, add, edit etc. through the semester. Further details will be given in class.   Feel free to be creative.

*A midterm progress report on your portfolio/blog will be available by the week March 14th, 2017. Please email me with SUBJECT HEADING: progress report and an active link to your blog if you would like a progress report. Full credit is obtained by successfully completing the assignments. Please treat your blog as you would any formal writing project (i.e., spelling and grammar still matter). Your final project is a 6-10 page APA style research proposal, following the guide in DDR book. The paper may be posted directly to your blog/pasted into your blog. Your proposal should be supported with a minimum of 5 empirical references. See Chapter 5 of DDR.   Potential topics will be discussed in class and might include (early learning, mind-mindfulness, language/literacy development, creativity, early attention/the environment, developing STE(A)M skills in early childhood/infancy). These topics are guided by selected readings and discussion this semester.

* Important note: up to three blog posts may be posted late and without consequence to your grade. By the end of the semester all your posts should be complete. Your entire blog should be complete by May 12th, 2017.

Jan 31 Tuesday

Class overview/syllabus

Blogs/portfolio

Homework: get books materials for class

Feb 3 Friday

Why development (Chapter 1, DDR)

How, what, why of developmental science research

Explore developmental science labs from around the world

Homework: Develop your blog. Complete exercise 2 on page 69 (post or add to portfolio).

 

Feb 7 Tuesday

Overview of blogs/groups/etc.

From non-verbal communication to language development (interactional synchrony, timing, LENA, Transcribing, etc).

Homework: Read Dickenson et al. (2012). How reading books fosters language development around the world. Child Development Research. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/cdr/2012/602807/

 

Develop a book for a 2 year old child (up to 10 pages) that applies at least 3 of the 6 principles discussed in the paper. This may be developed by hand or as an e-book.

Highlight how each of these principles was achieved. Post to your blog.

 

Feb 10 Friday

Using eye tracking in developmental research

Paper critique/discussion of Dickenson et al.

Class project: Find a minimum of 3 children’s books (for child up to 8 years old) and analyze each according to the Dickenson et al 6 principles. How many of these principles did you find? Discuss possible ways to study the effects of reading on literacy

 

Homework: post your analysis of the class project (up to 1,000 words) and images on your blog/portfolio.

Feb 14 Tuesday

Homework discussion

Discuss potential next steps for book/literacy related research

Symbolic play/media research

Watch Symbolic Understanding in Young Children: Challenges and Benefits

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCf-15bWLyI

Homework:

Read: Tomasello et al. (1999). Do young children use objects as symbols? British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 563-584. Address what question did this study address and what was new? Post answer on your blog (up to 300 words).

Complete Exercise 1 page 68 DDR (try to do this with symbols). You may post as a video or images. Include the references on your blog.

Feb 17 Friday

Immersing in research Chapter 4

In class exercise pg 70, exercise 3, DDR

Homework discussion

Homework: explore topics for your final project proposal. Document your findings/progress on your blog

Feb 21 Tuesday

Chapter 5: Developing research proposals

Research in the media/current trends & getting inspiration for your projects

Homework: Find 5 recent (last 6 months) research studies that focus on the developmental sciences. You may find these on the internet, magazines etc. Link these to your blog. Following the basic outline of pg 16 in DDR, explain what’s the question, what’s new and why the study is important. Are you able to find the original empirical articles? Link these as well if you like.

Feb 24 Friday

Review Homework and

Discussion of your final project proposals

Homework: Read Chapter 7 DDR

Complete Exercise 2 pg 120 with one paper. The paper you select should come from the journal Child Development, Infancy, or Developmental Science. Include the references on your blog.

Feb 28 Tuesday

Review Homework

Exploring methods commonly used in developmental science research (from brain measures to visual cliffs and special populations).

Chapter 7: Organizing and planning your study DDR

Chapter 8: Strategies for statistics DDR

Homework: Exercise 4 pg 121 (1-2 minutes) Take a video if you like and post to your blog. Also complete Exercise 5 pg 121 and post on your blog.

Class Friday the 3rd involves “at home” assignment

March 3 Friday

Watch the first half of Babies (2010).

Select two cultures of your choice. Develop a study to assess how babies learn in these cultures. Are the procedures the same across cultures, if not how might they differ. Up to 1,000 words.

 

March 7 Tuesday

Ethics overview, Chapter 2 DDR

Confounds, “drop outs” and other problems (and problem prevention)

In class exercise 5 on pg 73 DDR

Homework: Complete exercise 7 on pg 74 and pg 8 on pg 75 DDR

March 10 Friday

Recruitment strategies, Chapter 6

In class exercise: Exercise 3 pg. 102

Homework: complete Exercise 2 pg. 102 for your final project

March 14 Tuesday

Homework review

Researcher as designer for babies and children

MOMA, Design Museum Children’s Museum and Playgrounds

Homework: Read Fisher et al. (2014). Visual environment, attention allocation and learning in young children. Psychological Science, 1362-1370

March 17 Friday

Paper discussion and video

http://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/releases/heavily-decorated-classrooms-disrupt-attention-and-learning-in-young-children.html#.WI-N2rYrLEo

Playing “Devils Advocate” and follow up research – Do babies have morals? Do walls matter?

Homework: Continue to work on final project

March 21 Tuesday

In class exercise. Consider the walls (and the noise) Exercise 5 on pg 121 DDR.

Discussion of the “environment” /set up for your proposed studies

In class/outside exercise: Group analysis of playground/play space (weather permitting)

 

March 24 Friday

Writing up your research Chapter 9 and the publication process Chapter 10.

In class Exercise 3 & 4 pg 89 -91

March 28 Tuesday

Exploring local development labs and methods (prenatal development, motor development and clinical approaches)

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/251216485436944450/

http://profiles.columbiapsychiatry.org/profile/bbeebe

http://profiles.columbiapsychiatry.org/profile/wfifer

 

March 31 Friday

Joint Attention, Names, Intentions & Expressions, Autism (Striano)

Building your brand and marketing your research

In class pg 100, exercise 1 (start in class if time, or complete for homework)

 

April 4 Tuesday

Measuring and coding behavior/video coding exercises from You-Tube

Frequencies, durations etc. What to measure? Additional coding exercises as time allows.

 

April 7 Friday

Individual/group project development / progress discussion

Critical analysis by peers

 

April 11 Tuesday SPRING BREAK –

April 18 Tuesday SPRING BREAK

 

April 21 Friday

Media, apps, technology, media & toys

STE(A)M puzzles and play

Homework: Pretend you are a “mommy or daddy blogger”. Analyze a toy, app or video of your choice. What age is the object intended for? Try to link findings from 2-3 empirical articles to the toy, app or video or invent a toy and show how research supports it (i.e., you might link a special trampoline to specific research on motor development)

 

April 25 Tuesday

Communication of research

Chapter 11 DDR

Homework: Complete exercise 2 on page 169

 

April 28

Watch Babies Part 2

Complete exercise 3 on pg 120. (i.e., pretend that you have).

Homework: work on final project

 

May 2 Tuesday

Homework review

Final project presentation in class

 

May 5 Friday  

Final project presentation in class

Careers and research internships in the developmental sciences

 

May 9 Tuesday

Final project presentation in class

 

May 12 Friday

Final research proposals due 10-12 pages.

Final project presentation in class

Course evaluation

 

May 16 Tuesday

Final project presentation in class

Putting it together

 

 

 

 

 

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Class links

FINDING THE PROBLEM IS THE HARD PART

http://ecorner.stanford.edu/embeddedPlayer.html?mid=2738&width=500

Problems

http://www.tinaseelig.com/podcast.html

“Chopped” example

Failure is data

Improv and Experimentation
Failure in Experimentation
Sometimes your experiments will not work – but fail forward. Learn in the process.
Try new things

Innovation Demands Focus

http://ecorner.stanford.edu/embeddedPlayer.html?mid=3390&width=500

http://ecorner.stanford.edu/videos/3390/Innovation-Demands-Focus-and-Reframing

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Your final assignment (assignment 4)

Post your blog under Assignment 4, “Place your links here” You will see it on the right side.
Otherwise, bring in a hard copy to class (No late assignments accepted). Thanks!

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The Tale of the Princess Kaguya

IFC Center 323 Sixth Avenue at West Third Street | (212) 924-777

The Tale of the Princess Kaguya

The Tale of the Princess Kaguya

Directed by: Isao Takahata

Opens Friday, October 17

Email   Bookmark and Share

Shows starting before 6:00pm are in English; shows starting after 6:00pm are in Japanese with English subtitles.
Legendary Studio Ghibli co-founder Takahata (Grave of the FirefliesPom Poko) revisits an ancient Japanese folktale in this gorgeous, hand- drawn masterwork decades in the making. Found inside a shining stalk of bamboo by an old bamboo cutter (James Caan) and his wife (Mary Steenburgen), a tiny girl grows into an exquisite young lady (Chloë Grace Moretz). The beautiful princess enthralls all who encounter her—but ultimately she must confront her fate.
Official selection: Directors’ Fortnight, Cannes Film Festival

NR, 137 Minutes
Japan

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Assignment 4 Blogs Links here

Be sure that when we click the link it brings us to your active blog.  Have your class partner test your blog.

Be sure your full name is on  your blog (if you cannot use your name or do not wish to, please consider using a pen name).  If you select not to create a blog, you may hand in hard copy on due date. Please let Professor Striano know two weeks before Due Date.

Posted in Assignment 4 Place your LINKS here | 38 Comments

Optional Discussion Assignment 2 Post your answers here

If you have a blog, post your answers here (try to be sure your blog links to your name or a pen-name). Be sure that your links work.  Try to comment on other blogs. Join the discussion.

Posted in Discussion Assignment 2 | 2 Comments

Videos we discussed viewed

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqYgU6CjGds

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwgo2O5Vk_g

http://www.ted.com/talks/vs_ramachandran_the_neurons_that_shaped_civilization

http://www.ted.com/read/ted-studies

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FAO Discussion Question (optional) Post links here

Posted in Discussion Assignment 2 | Leave a comment